Android P: Our 5 favorite new features so far

Today marks the 7th day that Android P’s first developer preview has been available. In the time since, we’ve spent countless hours digging through P on our phones, decorticating every feature, and checking every tip about small and large changes alike. Our full list of P features has now surpassed 50 items and we’ve rounded them up with a quick description in case you don’t want to spend hours reading each one (though we encourage you to).

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Android P: Our 5 favorite new features so far was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Every new Android P feature we have found so far [Continuously updated]

Android P hero

It’s that time of the year again. The days are getting longer, new hardware is being released, and Google has revealed the next version of Android. As of the March 7th release of the developer preview, we’ve worked our way down Alphabet’s alphabet all the way to “P.” We still don’t know what P is going to end up standing for (Pineapple upside-down cake?), but by now we’ve got some idea for the changes present in this latest/upcoming version of Android. 

To paraphrase David, “I turned around, and it was Christmas.” Thanks to all our tipsters— we ❤ you— our collective Android Police inboxes overfloweth in a deluge of developer discovery.

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Every new Android P feature we have found so far [Continuously updated] was written by the awesome team at Android Police.

Google I/O 2018 schedule is up: New things for Wear, Chrome OS, Assistant, but no sign of TV or Auto yet

The Google I/O 2018 ticket sign up registration is now closed, but there’s something else on the I/O website that should grab your interest: the event schedule is now up and you can see that there might be two main keynotes on May 8, one from 10am to 11:30pm and one from 12:45pm to 1:45pm. I don’t think this format was used in the previous years: it used to be one long main keynote.

Aside from the main event, the schedule has a long list of sessions to look through just to try to gauge a bit what the next focus points for Google will be over the next year. There’s never anything super juicy there or any large slip, as Google often tends to leave a few sessions out from the schedule because their name is reliant on something being announced in the main keynote. But still, I took a quick look and found a few interesting/telling sessions:

And there are many sessions for developers about Kotlin, Firebase, Flutter, Instant apps, AR/VR, developing for the web, Google Pay, Assistant, and some sessions about understanding memory usage and battery drain in apps. All in all, it’s the usual except for two main missing topics: no Android TV, no Android Auto. Google sometimes adds more sessions as we approach I/O and even adds more sessions after the main keynote event, so there’s hope for them still, but this is where things are at for now.